Quantum Vision System

Here is “Dr” William Kemp, who claims to be an optometrist in Virginia, but does not exist as far as my research can tell (no Twitter account, no LinkedIn profile, no Facebook page, no practice website, no Virginia Optometric license, etc). He has a 30min video on Facebook (click-through ad) that cannot be rewound, only paused, and is not viewable on YouTube. He claims that for $37 you can get his book which, by his own admission, is yet another iteration of the now 100 year old Bates Method. In it, he says he can “cure” “ANY” vision problem and “ALL” prescriptions in just 7 days. The video presentation is rife with typos (“lense”, and “amerture” for example), impossible claims (reading the serial number of an airliner from the ground), and absolutely hilarious reinactments. But that’s not all! He also claims his method (Bates’, really, but reclaimed by him without giving credit) can help you remember things better, have improved brain function, reduce stress and even “detect all lies”! WOW, WHO WOULDN’T WANT ALL OF THAT!? Above are a few screenshots I took while I waded through his downright hilarious video in which he blames “greedy” optometrists for purposefully and knowingly prescribing “harmful” glasses that you don’t need in order to get you “addicted” and therefore sell you glasses of ever-increasing prescription at great profit, while at the same time suppressing this cheap and readily available “cure” for “ALL” eye problems. Glasses, he says (directly quoting William H. Bates circa 1920 but not giving Dr. Bates credit), not only CAUSE refractive error but ALSO exacerbate it! Wow what a racket for those “greedy” scumbag OD’s!!!!. He, of course, is the lone “optometrist” (ahem) who has broken the silence to sell out his optometrist peers and offer you this impossibly-easy “secret” to perfect vision, all for the low, low price of $37. The only thing missing from the hilarity of the presentation is a claim that the book was written by Kim Jong Un. One of my favorite parts is when he “shows off” his knowledge of optometry and physiology of the eye by claiming that the wearing of contact lenses “damages the optic nerve” HA! What a maroon.

Comments

  1. Thank you for posting this. I only hope more people will do some research before expecting the miracle cure from that joke of a so called Dr.

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    1. He did say you'd be able to recognize any lies. It's working! You can already see through his. That's worth something.

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    2. Another spelling error at the beginning of his video referred to him as being an 'optrometrist'. I must say the only reason I let the clip play out was to see how long it was. I got very bored after 25 minutes and just decided to google Quantum Vision. Much better result lol :)

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    3. Can you imagine how fast the news of 1000's of people being "cured" of near or far sightedness would have spread if there was even a shred of truth to this cure. Miracle cures (if they existed) would not need 30 minute hard sell infomercials they sell themselves.

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  2. What a maroon? If you're going to criticize some else's spelling, you should check your own.

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    1. I was referencing the old Bugs Bunny cartoons:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Kh7nLplWo

      if you're going to correct someone, be sure to know what you're correcting them on. a 10 sec Google search would have shown you this. did you really think I was just mispelling "moron"? and you figured you would "shame" me by pointing this out?

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    2. Awesome reference, princeidoc. And thanks for the short expose' on this cretin.
      The Quantum Vision "Doc" is a nin-cow-poop if he thinks we're all so gull-a-bull!

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    3. I love Bugs! and you obviously missed out! If you're going to lecture somebody, at least have the courage to show your name/face.

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    4. Maroon is an insult, just as moron is. Learn your dictionary...

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    5. Your saying , he said wearing contact lenses damages the eye...maybe you should look at his video again ...he said that if you go to bed with the contacts on they could roll to the back of the eyeball and damage the optic nerve..just get your story right ..i'am not saying that this is not a scam or isn't just saying to get your story staight...

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    6. well let's talk about that for a sec, since you're defending that statement:

      1) contacts cannot "roll to the back of the eyeball". Google "fornix".
      2) no contact lens can affect an optic nerve in any way. it is literally impossible. sleeping in contacts can cause all kinds of problems (ulcers, etc) but not "optic nerve" problems or damage. that absolutely cannot be done. at all.
      3) I would think most optometrists would know about #2, so the fact that he's claiming contacts can damage the optic nerve is pretty hilarious. he's obviously either not an optometrist, or (worse) he's a TERRIBLE, ignorant one.

      the problem here is the statement he made, not my interpretation of it. I was not confused by what he said. he just said something that is absolutely untrue and impossible. but thanks for the input!

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    7. Yeah, moron, it's not maroon. That's a color. lol lol lol

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    8. Anonymous is probably... Dr. Moron himself.

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    9. I actually let the video play while I read this blog and did other internet searches. I was waiting to see if they would give you the "free" session they promised in the very beginning of the video. (It seemed longer than 30 minutes) At the end, arrows flash for you to "add to the shopping cart", then the video just ends. No Free lessons, just another lie to add to the rest! And just as someone below said, if you try to leave the page, they drop the price to $29.

      My husband had laser done years ago. No complications, great results. I suppose that is the only real choice at this time. Or, if you have cataracts, they will correct your vision when the cataracts are removed by replacing your lens with a corrective lens! Insurance actually pays for the cataract surgery...we can only hope for cataracts! (sarcasm)

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    10. "AnonymousJanuary 6, 2015 at 5:32 PM
      What a maroon? If you're going to criticize some else's spelling, you should check your own." You also made a mistake. It's "someone" else's NOT "some" else's. Unless, you are Kemp and trolling this honest review of your scam!

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  3. 1,000 likes for princeidoc's final comment. Ha. Brilliant!!

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  4. I'm sorry, but that gave me a chuckle this morning! 😊
    Maroon/moron. Self righteous, Internet english teachers...They never seem to have a sence of humor, just a never ending need to correct people!

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    1. maroon...is how buggs bunny called his nemesis.

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  5. Thanks doc for the plain talk. Googling info on these creeps mostly turns up endless phony "review" sites created and carefully SEO'd by them. And the content is so phony it's embarrassing. It takes a lot of patience to unearth a genuine page like yours.

    Hate to say, but anyone dumb enough to give them money probably has it coming anyway for being so gullable.

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    1. he says guaranteed...and if u pay by charge card, and doccument that info prior, you can try the service and your charge card co will refund u if ur not satisfied. u really cant lose to try, if u dont mind a bit of hassle.

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    2. Well, except that I'm telling you that it is 100% false and a lie and a scam. So you very much *CAN* "lose" by purchasing this product. You expect people who are knowingly selling a lie to be honest and willingly refund your money if/when you ask them to? That's a pretty big leap of faith there.

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    3. Hey I actually bought it. Couldn't get my money back. Never worked. So for those who think it will nobody I gave it to improved.

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    4. Not really gullable, just desperate, have worn glasses since I was 4 years old adn hate them. Compared to what I gave spent over the years, and watching my folks struggle to pay for them, meant that if I spent $50 which it cost me from Australia, it really was nothing to lose.
      it does lok scammy. It is very cheesy. it is probably some old geezer making dough off someone elses ideas.
      But there is a glimmer in that all the free stuff available, is teaching the same exercises. so I'll try them until my money back guarantee runs out.

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  6. Coke bottle glasses a minus seven, aren't very thick glasses a high plus Rx. As a rule of thumb? I've seen that actor in a different video. Dr.? Highly unlikely.

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  7. Basically it is a PDF file being sold with a lot of word padding and simple textbook info about eyes and is just a rewording of the Bates Method. The actual author of the 50 some pages PDF appears to be a Jennifer Andrus. I got hold of a copy that had the PDF protection removed and had been converted to a Kindle format ;)

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    1. What exactly is the name of the publication?

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  8. Some folks just have nothing better to do, princeidoc. I say, thanks for your time to point out some indications that this offer might be "less than honest".

    Another thing I noticed is that if you Google "Quantum Vision System", you will find a myriad of "fake" websites that set themselves up to look like reviews, but turn out to be dummy sites that are actually selling the product... All of them having the same yellow "special offer" button at the bottom. I've seen this same tactic with other bogus products.

    Oh, well.... What is it they say about things that seem to be too good to be true? ;)

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  9. It seems to me that you might be a bit threatened by this technology princeIdoc, being that you are indeed an optometrist yourself, you may more than likely have a bias skew. Now, am I saying this so called "Doctor" is legit or illegitimate? Not at all, I've never met him in person or checked his credentials. Am I saying that the system works, or not? Of course not! I haven't tried it for myself! Are you quite sure the system doesn't work? It's only $37 to try with a 100% money back guarantee! Surely you can afford it being an optometrist. Moreover, I would say that all things we have today, whether it be technologies, or art, or degrees from MIT, Harvard University or Yale, all have their humble beginnings beyond ourselves, and not everyone gets the credit they deserve. Your optometry degree was earned by your study of the works and research of countless others who have gone before you, but do they get the credit every time you sell a pair or glasses, or do an eye exam? What I will agree to however, are the typos and the unprofessional quality of the video itself, but I think it's to early to besmurch his name, or the system he is presenting. Heck, if it works, I don't care if he dug up the guys coffin to pull the notebook from the guys bonny skeletal hands... especially for $37. So, he took some suppressed technology, put his own spin on it and resold it. WHATS WRONG WITH THAT? We live in America and people do it every day... the real question is, does it work, or is he truly a charlatan? He may be a bad speller, but if you don't really have the answers to these two questions, then I suspect that you just might be afraid of being put out of business. Sincerely, AP- Denver

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    1. Haha! These replies crack me up. Yes, you got me! I am "threatened" by "technology!" A book written in the 1920's by a guy who literally thought that the visual system shot light (lasers?) out of the eye in order to see...that's cutting edge stuff! Why wouldn't I be scared and mystified by that "new technology?"

      "WHATS WRONG WITH THAT?", you ask. Well when I see someone on the net literally trying to SCAM someone else into spending money on a process that I know to be 100% untrue, I feel the need to tell people not to waste their time! What is wrong with THAT? Does it work? NO. It has never worked and has been scientifically disproven repeatedly. Is he a charlatan? YES. Yes, he is. But you're right - I only posted this because I'm "afraid" of being "put out of business" by an optometrist in a state 1000 miles away from me who doesn't have a valid license and may not exist at all. You figured me out!

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    2. That is exactly how you can tell its a con....For ONLY $37 you can have this miracle XXXXX....All they need for a pay day is to lure in X amount of people gullible enough to send in a small amount of money...sooooo, 1,000,000 watch said video, 900,000 see a scam and send no money, 80,000 don't have an extra $37 they are willing to try on an unproved product BUT 20,000 sheep send in $37 and BAM, fake doctor with no tangible credentials or practice now has 3 quarters of a million dollars! This is actually how con men determine the price they need to 'Sell their product' for to acheive the amount they want to pay themselves. They count on at least 20,000 out of a million to say to themselves and anyone else asking, "hey, you never know, it might work". They need people like you to make a scamming...errr to make a killing :)

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  10. There are multiple spelling errors on the video, which made me wonder if this was real. Did a Google search and found your post. So glad I did! Always good to follow your gut. My optometrist told me years ago glasses would make my vision worse because your muscles relax and get used to the "new" vision so this guy had me interested. Until I searched for his name. Too bad they didn't use a real doctor!

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    1. ""My optometrist told me years ago glasses would make my vision worse because your muscles relax and get used to the "new" vision"

      Unfortunately that is not true, either. Glasses do not worsen refractive error (they also do not improve it)

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    2. Exactly! Glasses neither improve nor worsen refractive error. If they did, then my eyesight would have either gotten better or worse in the past six years, but neither has happened. This fake Dr. on the video is a consummate con artist, and common sense should make that obvious, but as Walt Disney so eloquently once said, "There's a sucker born every minute." That's what con artists count on,

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    3. I think P.T. Barnum is generally credited for saying that, but your point is well taken!

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    4. Actually, I think David Hannum is the one credited for saying that to criticise Barnum and his costumers. Anyway, it still applies.

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  11. OMG! Now he's pushing lie detection and speed reading! LOL

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  12. Also look into candidia, which is " causing " everything from depression to obesity. A fake disease for a real yeast bacteria " gone into overdrive" supposedly. All to sell something called probiotics. The internet is rampant with fake claims and it is refreshing to see someone give us the straight poop.

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    1. At the risk of sounding officious and sanctimonious - Candida is a yeast not a bacteria. It usually lives quite happily on several of the body's surfaces and only becomes an issue when those surfaces are compromised or the immune system is struggling. Probiotics have their uses - especially if you're on a course of antibiotics. However I understand your point and concur whole-heartedly

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  13. Thanks for this review. It was impossible to find a legitimate review online, most sites being a place to order the system, and most "reviews" containing wrong spelling and grammar. I suspect they're mostly overseas sites/scams. Thanks again,princeidoc.

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    1. I sent the money and received nothing even though my spelling was correct. Oh! If someone had spelt it out that I was dealing with a crook!

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  14. On the bright side, they do follow though with refunds via Click Bank, no questions asked.

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    1. Did you purchase it?

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    2. I recall the person who posted the mobi of it stated they had and that they got a refund afterwards.

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  15. Thanks for putting this information out here. I did a web search of Kemp as well...I found Kemp's...Just not the one on here. (the eyesight salvation joke)
    You have to figure, even if only 1% of the people that view that "youtube" (not) presentation buy into it, the internet thief is going to make a crap ton of money. BTW, when I viewed it, it was "On Special" for only $29.99.

    Keep up the good work.
    Carl

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  16. I can't comment on this specific program (certainly sounds wildly exaggerated, at least), but there are real optometrists who do, for instance, use exercises to treat nearsightedness. I am highly nearsighted, and one such optometrist told me that I probably could have reversed it naturally when it was first developing, but that it's probably too late now. And there is no doubt that he is a real optometrist (I could give you his name privately, and perhaps forward part of the discussion if you are interested.)

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    1. Unfortunately I know there are some OD's out there who believe in this. I studied under at least 2 of them at SUNY. Let's just say I wholeheartedly DIS-agree and so does the vast majority of the medical profession, OD's & MD's alike. There are no eye exercises that work to reduce/eliminate/prevent myopia.

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    2. What makes you so sure that they're wrong?

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    3. they have no science-based evidence that it works. *ONLY* anecdotal evidence. *ALL* actual studies on this show that it does not work.

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    4. Even in an "actual study", I would assume that the exercises would usually be done at home. How can we be sure that the subjects actually did the exercises as often as they were supposed to? The behavioral optometrist I talked to said that the exercises have to be done 2 or 3 times per day for up to 12 months. Moreover, do we know what the subjects were doing the rest of the time? Were they doing a lot of near-work? How often did they wear their regular prescription glasses? What about their diet? And how nearsighted were they, and how long ago had it developed? With so many factors, your assessment seems quite simplistic. It would be more accurate to say (assuming that this is true) that studies have thus far been unable to substantiate such an approach to nearsightedness.

      I originally went to a regular optometrist (I'll call him Dr. W), who said the same thing that you have said here. Later, I contacted a behavioral optometrist, Dr. A, who gave a very different answer. Another behavioral optometrist said she agreed with Dr. A's answer. It further turned out that Dr. W referred people to Dr. A for convergence insufficiency (which Dr. W's office confirmed when I mentioned it.) So I figured there was a chance to educate Dr. W about nearsightedness. However, my subsequent emails to Dr. W's office were ignored.

      Did you ever discuss this at any length with the SUNY optometrists you mentioned? If you haven't, maybe you should try to, if they're still accessible. I'm sure you wouldn't want to mislead any patients who might ask about this.

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    5. really? so what you're telling me is that:

      1) professionals disagree, which I already knew
      http://myeyepod.blogspot.com/2011/09/newsflash-professionals-disagree.html

      and

      2) you found some behavioral optometrists who believe that eye exercises work to reduce myopia, as long as they're done 3x/day for at least a year with no near work and the right diet (whatever that is)? hmm.

      I don't want to "discuss this at length" with any other OD or you, for that matter. I firmly, FIRMLY believe that eye excercises to reduce myopia are a scam. that is not "misleading" anyone. again, it has been established that those who believe that they *DO* work...cannot prove it, despite many, many attempts in the last literally 100 years. so what does that say?

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    6. Hi, I found your blog and just thought I'd add my two cents to it. I was found to be nearsighted at 8 years old. At the age of 12, my dad lent me a book which a hippie friend had lent him, about "natural vision correction" through daily eye exercises. Well at 12 years old, I was like any pre-teen girl, I wanted to be beautiful and I HATED my glasses with a passion, and jumped at the opportunity to be rid of them and permanently fix my bad vision. I read the book from cover to cover. Several times daily performed all sorts of eye exercises religiously for many months. Needless to say, I am now nearly 40 and my vision is just as lousy as it was when I was 12. So based on my own firsthand experience, I am quite skeptical of any "miracle method" that is proclaiming that exercise alone can fix imperfect vision.

      I too could not get all the way through the sales video. I got tired of listening to the "doctor" rambling on and on and never getting to the main point. Eventually I got frustrated with it and googled to find reviews instead, and I found this page. So thanks for creating and sharing this blog. It's nice to know I'm not the only skeptic out there.
      ~Mia in CA

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    7. Mia: thank you for sharing your story. Do you happen to know what your visual acuity was when you were 12? Did you need glasses for nearly everything, or just to read the board at school? If your vision is really "just as lousy" now as then, that means that it's the same now as then.

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    8. I don't know what my vision was at that age. Now I am -3.25 in the left eye with astigmatism, and -3.75 in the right. When I was a kid I was told I needed to wear my glasses at school, and while watching TV, and my parents would let me take them off otherwise, because I hated them so much. But in all reality, if I look back on it, I remember that I probably needed them all the time despite not wearing them. I was nearsighted, but everything more than just a foot or two away from me was blurry. I remember the Dr. changing my prescription several times when I was younger, but he hasn't changed it now in about 15 or more years. What I meant by "just as lousy now as then" is that my vision never improved at all with the exercises. I started wearing contacts at about age 15, after going nearly 3 years with never wearing my glasses at all (again because I hated them). So the claim in the sales video about glasses making your vision worse is bogus as far as I see it, because my eyes got worse without wearing anything for a very long period of time.
      ~Mia in CA

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    9. Yes, nearsightedness often does get worse even without wearing glasses. I didn't wear glasses at all until I was at 20/200, and wore them sparingly until I was around 20/400. Of course, the progression of nearsightedness could still be influenced by other habits, such as near-work or diet. If natural vision methods work at all, I get the impression that you have to get a lot of things right, and doing one thing wrong could negate otherwise fervent dedication to the methods. Then again, maybe that's just a convenient excuse for failure.

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    10. diet definitely does NOT influence myopia. that is false. whether or not "near work" influences myopia is hotly debated. it is my personal opinion that it DOES NOT.

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    11. Is there any objective data regarding a connection or lack thereof between near-work and myopia?

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    12. not a definitive study. multiple studies that say they show a correlation to myopia and near work exist...as do multiple studies showing that NO correlation exists. this is hotly debated in the profession. there is no "ah-ha" moment. nothing has been proven.

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    13. Do you advocate the 20-20-20 computer rule (i.e. after using the computer for 20 minutes, look at something at least 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds)? Interestingly, my optometrist recommended that on his website, but then in another post he said that computer use will not harm the eyes.

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    14. I'm not opposed to the 20-20-20 rule to alleviate *eyestrain* and headaches from long hours of computer use, but the 20-20-20 rule does not slow/stop myopia.

      and computers don't "harm" eyes. they just cause symptoms like headache and eyestrain.

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    15. Why We shouldn't trace route the add or the page web and find the IP and the server from where originate the scam. I'm not a hacker, but I know we can get inside the PC if we tracert commands. The Police should know how to find these jokers and put an end to them.

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    16. MAJOR UPDATE: The optometrist I mentioned above, "Dr. W", has apparently reconsidered. His office posted a pro-natural vision improvement quote from Dr. Jacob Liberman. I wondered whether Dr. W's office might have posted that by mistake, considering that Dr. W had told me the exact same thing that Dr. Prince says here. Eventually, however, Dr. W made a blog post about refractive errors, and mentioned vision therapy as a possible alternative to glasses or contacts. So I guess he has changed his mind.

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  17. As Michael said, this is a scam.
    Here's another review of the super Kemp Method:
    http://eyeexercisesforcomputerusers.com/quantum-vision-system-review/

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  18. Everything on this guy seems to have been posted up on 23rd and 24th of December ....m so tempted as getting rid of glasses would be great but skeptical. ?..

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  19. Did anyone else notice that he was giving the vision test with his ipad? I don't know about anyone else, but my eye doctor has the vision test permanently affixed to his wall.

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    1. Haha! I did! I was going to add that in but the post was getting long. Yes he has a wall mounted digital acuity meter and he chooses to have the patient stand near the door as he stands DIRECTLY BENEATH THE ACUITY METER...holding his iPad. Genius!

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    2. There is a random guy eyesight corrected from -9.00 to -7.00 (claim by the doctor) can read the smallest words in the ipad without his spectacle.
      That is just IMPOSSIBLE!!

      Dom - Malaysia

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  20. lol how can contacts damage your optic nerve? the conjunctiva makes sure that nothing goes behind. And the shape of the eye, cornea and crystalline lens influences the refractive status of the eye.

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  21. i see quite a bit of 'he said' vs 'he said' here...
    However, My grandfather used the Bates method of exercising - and, until his death at the age of 88 yrs and 10 months could read perfectly without the aid of reading glasses. He also did not need distance glasses. How can this be possible in your theory?

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    1. possibilities:
      1 - tiny pupil (miosis)
      2 - he didn't read much
      3 - he was myopic in 1 eye
      4 - he lied

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    2. scam or not , at 27 dollars a try its worth it especially with a money back guarantee

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    3. I wholeheartedly disagree. But hey - it's your $27! "A fool and his money are soon parted." - Olde English proverb

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    4. Hey, if you really want to try it, free torrent download here :) http://5.157.80.91/quantum-vision-system-t10244676.html#technical

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    5. I tried that url, and it put up a login dialog box asking for a user name and password.

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  22. Did it never occur to you that white text on black background really hurts the eye to read? Try reading this page for 30 seconds.. then look at a blank wall. Tell me you don't see the lines of ghost text. Try something with a little less contrast. Even black text on white background is far better.

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    1. actually this is hotly debated. google it. it's a personal preference. some people love it, others don't.

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    2. Well, YOUR comment, Anonymous, is black on gray. Happy now?

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  23. You can view his video on YouTube (with pause, forward, rewind) here:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JVcupbWZSA

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    1. THANK YOU! I couldn't find this on youtube by searching! awesome!

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  24. I didn't read all the posts--only to see that you (Dr. Prince) noticed the same things I did. I about fell off my chair when he said that about contacts rolling around in your eye and damaging your optic nerve! And all the misspellings! But what else is quite obvious to me is that "anonymous" is most likely the illustrious "Dr." himself. Who else would defend such idiocy!!

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  25. http://www.reviewsfactor.com/quantum-vision-system-dr-john-kemp-review while researching it I found this. It says that it's by Dr. John Kemp

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    1. well, the video itself says William Kemp...

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    2. at the 27:26 mark of the youtube vid he introduces himself as "Dr. William Kemp". I just think the reviewers "Rita & Alex" made a mistake with the name.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JVcupbWZSA

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    3. So much for the Quantum Memory system then :)

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  26. He spelled amateur wrong. Other than that I'm not sure I believe this.

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  27. My original post got so long, I forgot a couple of items.

    I see a lot of misspellings in blogs. I suspect that it's from using our mobile devices, with their "predictive text" or "auto-correct" actually causing spelling or grammatical errors, tiny keyboards, tiny displays, and hitting the "Send" button just a little bit too soon.... It has little bearing on the blogger or validity of the post.

    Webpages and videos is another matter. Errors there indicate a red flag, to me.

    About Dr. Kemp and his claims.... Well, his video pretty much convinced me that it was just hype. He talks for way too long, bashing eyeglasses, and the eyeglass industry, and over-justifying his product. I watched it for about 20 minutes. (I only watched it for that long, because I let it ramble while I was shaving, hoping he'd eventually show his product. Nope!) I felt he should have closed his sales pitch after 2 minutes, then gotten to his product. I never made it to the end of his video. When someone spends too much time justifying his product, instead of showing it; well that's a red flag.

    Also, he doesn't need to bash glasses, contacts, and the eyeglass industry at all. We wear glasses and contacts! We know what's wrong with wearing them, and buying them. We already know what we hate. Is he trying to sell his product to folks who have always had perfect vision? Come on! First rule of advertising, "Know your audience!"

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    1. Exactly my thoughts - you hit the nail on the head!

      Lisa

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    2. I like it when the Dr Kemp asked how you felt after cleaning your glasses...do you feel more confident ?..HAPPIER ??....Are you freakin' kidding me ??...The difference is I can see the porn on my TV better ;)

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    3. I'm the national chairman of the Dan Quayle Award Committee. We present an annual prize of $27.00 for the worst misspelling of the year. Even though the year is less than half over, we confidently select Dr. Kemp as the winner for 2015 for his rendering of the word "amateur" as "amerature." Dr. Kemp, we salute you.

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    4. Yes, not dissimilar to Nigerian misspelling

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  28. The presentation is a identical to one on a cure for diabetes. Same price same guarantee, all are scams in my opinion.

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  29. Has anyone found any real reviews of people who actually bought this?

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  30. Agree this is a scam; however i want to add that in my personal experience i have a test case where it appears eyeglasses did accelerate the nearsightedness. I am partially blind in one eye ( retinal infection; nearsighted in the other, have a identical twin that is nearsighted in both eyes. Glasses were proscribed to correct the nearsightedness in 4th grade -- on all eyes mentioned except my 'blind' eye with the retinal damage which had a 'zero' diopter balance . fast forward to post college days -- lens strength had steadily increased from 3.5 diopters to 7 ; the 'new ' glasses only seemed to remain 20/20 for a couple months - on all eyes EXCEPT the one that had the zero balance -- that eye is still about 3.5. Does it prove eyeglasses did it? no, but the correlation is certainly remarkable and it makes me skeptical when anyone positively asserts that eyeglasses do not cause degradation. btw lens strength seemed to stop increasing when i switched to contacts - but that may be coincidence with age / growth slowing.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Anyone who promotes a scam like this will surely be caught in the end & will not go unpunished since there is a law of reaping & sowing that will not discriminate whatsoever. Liars, cheats,& thieves will all be accountable for their actions to their Creator as It has been written. Why not try to do something honest that actually helps people and then the product sells itself when no"Gimmick" will ever be needed since the honest truth will always be something everyone welcomes into their lives!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  32. If those Asians could not even spell optometrist properly, it smells FISHY!
    (They spelled it optRometrists)
    This scam was probably "made in China" ha ha

    ReplyDelete
  33. I knew when it took 10 minutes to hear what it actually was that he was a salesman at best and when he stopped people on the street I had to laugh. If it truly worked he would be all over facebook twitter etc. come on.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Thanks for putting this information out here.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Quantum Vision.
    Could this be the true, working version of
    " Better Sight Without Glasses " we found & tried 40 yrs ago, age 15 ?
    We would greet like Spock doing the split fingure hand gesture ... but
    eyes up left, down right, across right, up left, crossed, uncrossed ...

    I just HAD to watch this video to the end .... the expected " Buy NOW " end.

    My eyes have gone exactly the same as my Dad's at exactly the same age ....
    same prescription for the last 10 years ..
    Not looking forward to the glaucoma he suffered, which blinded his Mum, my Gran !!

    Gran ! Almost rymes with SCAM !!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I also tried this without success around age 15. But I wonder if things might have been different had I instead discovered it at age 9, at perhaps 20/100 instead of 20/600, and perhaps even gotten help from a rare optometrist who supports that kind of approach.

      Delete
    2. Not looking forward to glaucoma...but you can smoke weed to help when you do get it, :)

      Delete
    3. actually, that too is a myth. marijuana is not, end never has been used for treating glaucoma. this is a widely propagated myth, but a myth nonetheless. sorry.

      Delete
    4. Not entirely, THC lowers intraocular pressure, which is general procedure for treating glaucoma.

      Delete
    5. It does. For approx 8min, which is unfortunately pretty useless for medical treatment.

      Delete
    6. hahaha 8 minutes is just enough time to roll the next one :)

      Delete
  36. yes. yet another iteratation of the Bates Method...aka "BM" :P

    ReplyDelete
  37. If you try to close the Google window, you get the option of "Leave page" or "Stay on Page".
    Select "Stay on Page" - you then get the lot for $27.
    My vote is the guy is a con artist.
    For an extra 50 cents he will throw in a cure for Aids and world famine ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  38. Where is your evidence for actually trying his method? Everything you have mentioned is gathered completely from a google search. I feel I just wasted my time reading your blog, equally as much as having to listen to the over sale of the quantum vision system.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So it took you 45min to read this?

      I haven't tried it. This is a century old theory that has been repeatedly debunked. I'm making fun of it, can you not tell? I am not giving any credence at all to this old, wrong theory. I am not going to try it and it is my professional opinion that it is a scam.

      Delete
  39. You can easily watch that video on youtube, rewind, etc ..
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7JVcupbWZSA

    ReplyDelete
  40. http://www.t utteyes.ca/our-eye-doctors/John-Kemp-Kelowna

    ReplyDelete

  41. Dr. John Kemp - Clinic Founder, Optometrist, Partner

    John was born and raised in New Liskeard, Ontario. He graduated from the School of Optometry at the University of Waterloo in 1979, before moving to the Okanagan.

    Dr Kemp’s expertise transfers outside of the office as well, where he excels in hockey, skiing, and golf. He also enjoyed coaching minor hockey and track and field for many seasons.

    Dr. Kemp spent 8 years elected to the Board of Directors of the British Columbia Association of Optometrists. But one of his greatest joys has been participating on a number of volunteer projects developing eye care in Morocco, Ecuador and Ethiopia.
    http://www.tutteyes.ca/our-eye-doctors/John-Kemp-Kelowna

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So he has a practice in Virginia? And a valid VA lic? Because in the video he says he's in VA.

      Delete
    2. Not the same person! That is Dr. JOHN KEMP. The guy Quantum Vision System is WILLIAM KEMP he intuduces himself as such in the video. And they don't look alike either.

      Delete
  42. That website is Canadian. Hmm. This does not sound fishy at all. This sounds totally legit. [/sarcasm]

    ReplyDelete
  43. Replies
    1. Look at the picture published on the website!! !!! Yes, it looks like him, but much younger.

      Delete
  44. From my own experience,I KNOW for sure it is detox through sufficient sleep(at least) and not forsing and straining the eyes(many hours)- and focus of mind that keeps the eysight clear. Using glasses regularly and for long periods of time changes the brain and perception and makes the muscles weak . So as long as you can remember seeing-there is hope with focus added.He is right after all..

    ReplyDelete
  45. No I'm sorry but none of that is true. Using glasses does not change your brain nor your perception and does not make your "muscles weak". "focus of the mind" does not "keep your eyesight clear". None of that is factual or scientific.

    ReplyDelete
  46. why does he waste 30 minutes trying to convince himself that his product is good...30 minutes of my life that I will never get back.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Does this method work for diabetics with diabetic retinopathy ?

    ReplyDelete
  48. No. It doesn't work for anything except wasting time. And money.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Thank you for posting this. I only hope more people will do some research before expecting the miracle cure from that joke of a so called Dr.

    ReplyDelete
  50. @Michael Prince - FYI I wore glasses for many years and my eyesight got worse with every checkup. I switched to contacts and my eyesight has actually IMPROVED. I am not an optometrist, but I'm thinking it's because the eye has to strain to see through glasses that are an inch or more away, as opposed to contacts being directly on the eye. Also, obviously I doubted this "deal" from Mr. whoeverhe is, which is how I ended up here. However, you are obviously totally closed-minded to any new ideas, so I wouldn't listen to you either. New ideas take time to be proven in studies, so it can be worth at least giving them a listen and maybe even a try. It used to be firmly believed the world was flat, remember?

    ReplyDelete
  51. "FYI I wore glasses for many years and my eyesight got worse with every checkup. I switched to contacts and my eyesight has actually IMPROVED"

    I think you're probably just talking about a vertex distance conversion.

    " but I'm thinking it's because the eye has to strain to see through glasses that are an inch or more away, as opposed to contacts being directly on the eye"

    It's not.

    "However, you are obviously totally closed-minded to any new ideas"

    'NEW IDEAS' like the Bates Method that was published literally 95 years ago in 1920?

    "New ideas take time to be proven in studies, so it can be worth at least giving them a listen and maybe even a try"

    Yeah you're right. I guess 95 years is probably not long enough for people to decide whether this works or not, huh?

    Read this: http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/eyequack.html

    ReplyDelete
  52. Just do what I do. At parties or clubs, put your glasses in your pocket. Talk to the pretty girl and smile a lot. It's actually easier, since her face is foggy and you can't read her emotions and responses as easily. You'll be smoother and more confident. When the two of you go to get in your car, yank out your glasses and say, "I better put on my glasses. I'm not supposed to drive without them." By then, the deal's already done. If you're not sure, yank the glasses back off when you get to your apartment building.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. .. or just wear contacts.

      Delete
    2. Glasses are not a deal breaker with women :)

      Delete
    3. Oh, hi Dr Kemp. Please rush me the "reanimation of dead flesh"

      Delete
  53. This is Dr. Kemp. Please everybody, do not be fooled by fake reviews posted on this site. These are simply paid spokesman of the evil, multi-billion dollar eye care industry. My system not only repairs eyes that have been damaged by the wicked eye glasses industry, but just this morning I have fine tuned my system and can now bring sight back to the blind. I am also breaking this announcement here for the first time, but I have also perfected a system for the reanimation of dead flesh, it involves elevating the cadaver on a platform so that it can be repeatedly struck by lightning. Unfortunately my first successful test subject had escaped, but he'll turn up sooner or later. But in the meantime, if there are any blind people reading this, please order my system for the insanely low price of only $37, plus shipping, handling, tax, postage, cost of ruining to the post office, and various other administrative fees. As a bonus I'll even throw on a video of my attempted experiments in making toe nails stop growing, I mean who needs them, am I right??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was sooooo funny! Well worth the 30 minutes I wasted on that maroons video (I am old enough to have gotten the joke,Michael). Thank you! Loved it!

      Delete
  54. It shouldn't be easy now days to scam people, because of the Internet research. I tried to search for dr.kemp license all over United States. Results 0. It sounded good though.... to good... thanks for this bog.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I was hoping I'd find a blog about this! I knew from the first few min this was a scam and the cheesy patient actors who miraculously could see better in his office only confirmed my intuition. I realize people are desperate to have solutions to poor eyesight..me included..but especially nowadays w/all the scams u gotta b careful about putting ur credit card out there! I'm glad some of u did ur homework

    ReplyDelete
  56. Thanks for this informative blog. I might otherwise have ordered this fake vision system.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Hell,i AM the REAL doctor Kemp.
    Take no notice of the people who say this is a scam.
    Send me just $20 NOW, and as an extra special bonus I WILL ALSO THROW IN another of my books entitled "How to extract money from almost anybody,with ease".POSTAGE IS FREE.You get an extra, extra special double never to be repeated offer of another book called "I sent money to a fake Doctor and received nothing in return"
    Click the link now,before it gets removed and could even be removed before i even finish this senten....................................................

    ReplyDelete
  58. Gabriel B from Ireland.
    I'm really grateful for this blog, not just it confirmed my doubts but it also made me laugh so much. It's 5AM here and I'm going for 3hrs nap with big smile on my face. Thank you all so much, goodnight and God bless and hope my opticien never leaves my neighborhood. Amen

    ReplyDelete
  59. I usually use the rule that the longer the presentation without specifics, the less likely that the product is useful.

    ReplyDelete
  60. So does it work or not? I want to buy it, but don't know if its real or not.

    ReplyDelete
  61. it does not work. it is a scam. it is not real.

    ReplyDelete
  62. On my behalf and my friend who came to my house to day all excited about this new miracle cure he found in his inbox. I had to show him this blog to prove to him that it's all lies and just a scam. I, we THANK you so much Michael Prince for this blog. I just can't imagine how many poor victims are out there making this fake Dr and scammer richer everyday.
    How could something like this and in today's day and age keeps going on and on and on and creating more victims every minute of the day.
    How did he get my and my friend's email addresses? we live in very small village with only 2 little shops in it and surrendered by half dozen other villages without any other shops.
    This scammer needs to be stopped before he becomes a millionaire if he is not already.
    isn't there some governing body in this mighty country of America who controls online scams? no wonder other things like terrorism are spreading like wild fire. This is just unbelievable in 2015! So once again thanks a million for creating this blog and we should all share this link in facebook and alike to try and put word out there about this scumbag of scammer.

    ReplyDelete
  63. Surely such a "miracle" cure deserves a bit more "spell-check" than this video got! There is so much quackery going on here that I thought I was surrounded by ducks.

    ReplyDelete
  64. I know for certain it is a scam but seriously though. It got my hopes up. I didn'tay money but I did lose 30 mins of my life watching a video with bad spelling and bad acting

    ReplyDelete
  65. It's the Illuminati!!! Bwah ha ha ha!! They're EVERYWHERE!!!!!!!

    :)

    ReplyDelete
  66. It's really creepy!
    Every first year med student knows that a contact lense cannot even get anywhere near where the optic nerve lies... I lost 30 minutes of predious time of my life today, but I learned more about how to trust my gut feelings next time when a web site comes along in this kind of dodgy creepy salesman's style... A pathetic "amerture" lol! who surely has never studied medicine and tries to scam in big style, pretending to be an eye doctor...

    ReplyDelete
  67. So who is Kemp, really? a character in a novel... The Invisible Man, by H.D. Wells!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No.He's William Kempe trying to use his clown moves...And

      Delete
  68. It's good to read all these comments here. A few days ago I came to his video and listened a bit. I must say he is a good actor. He used in his clip almost every convincing strategy of Robert Cialdinis book. 1. principle of authority: he was wearing a gown; emphasized his title (Dr.) 2. principle of scarceness: he was trying to force the "patient" to buy it NOW, and that he could never again do it again. This strategy is also used by flight companies when they write "only 2 seats available" or in shops when they say "this is our very LAST exemplare" 3. principle of reciprocity: he was acting as if he is doing you a FAVOUR that needs gratitude. He reduced the price and "shared his great secret with us normal people". So we are supposed to give back the favour by spending just 37 dollars. 4. principle of social evidence: "if everyone is looking up, I will look up too", in his case it was the people on the street functioning as evidence for the credibility of his method. This is what is very often showed in advertising, a woman confirming all the words of the one who is advertising. Another interesting "coincidence" is that his forename is William just as that of Bates (William Bates). Sorry my terrible English, but it's very late here...

    ReplyDelete
  69. For me, what gave it away as a scam was the excessive use of imagery and big bold words emphasizing every little point. He goes on and one about how your life will be after using "the method" but never explains what the method actually is. The explanation on how this whole thing works is what I watched the video for but it never came. A real product, especially one that work as well as it claims, doesn't need even a 2 minute sales pitch let alone 30 minutes of it. All it takes it an explanation on how it works and word of mouth.

    ReplyDelete
  70. Wish I'd read this blog before I sent $74 off - one system for each eye because I'm shortsighted in both....
    I'm also indebted to the reference to the Robert Cialdinis book and his 5 principles. The 4 mentioned above and the 5th which is clearly 'wear the suckers down' and which is obviously a deliberate strategy because almost all the quack cures like this and the financial 'get rich quick' equivalents do it. I'm not sure what the thinking is but there's a Darwinian thing going on because they all do it. Not only is it hard to come up with reams of authoritative wording without actually saying something but the cadence and tone is very well done for the whole 30 minutes. This bit of it impressed me. Like a Mussolini or Hitler speech - stamina!
    Patrick (but posting as anon because it's easier than registering!)

    ReplyDelete
  71. Oh MY gawd. I thought it was a special eye exercise- I got irritated after twenty minutes and decided to google it. Realized it was a friggin scam :P. I must say that ridiculous doctor SUCKS at acting.

    ReplyDelete
  72. In the video I saw, he said he was from Lexington, Kentucky. When I searched him, most blogs said he was from Virginia. Got my hopes up. : ( Sounds bogus to me.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Definitely a sham and i fell for it. Money back guarantee? Not so when they take the link down and the website hoiding the e-book is not accessable. Save you money

    ReplyDelete
  74. It's cheaper to follow all the eye exercises people themselves have tried out and uploaded on You Tube, and then find out for yourself if and how it works for you. And the reviewers who link to the Quantum Vision System offering discounts on You Tube... well the comments are switched off and not to be seen anymore... so what's happening here? I become suspicious in a healthy way when I see this... Are they being paid for putting up their positive review on You Tube? You never know but this site has helped me anyhow to NOT purchase it and keep up the critical, sane thinking... so THANKS! And eventually, I do believe in the power of restoring vision with exercises etc. but it's very necessary and good to debunk these stories and ads!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "I do believe in the power of restoring vision with exercises etc."

      I don't.

      Delete
  75. If this really worked, no one would be wearing glasses & the people in the video saying that it worked for them, most likely are paid actors.

    ReplyDelete
  76. While the quantum program might be fake/scam. It's true that your eyesight will slowly self correct by itself over a long period of time.

    People are short sighted looking at close up activities, like text reading, HP, computers with poor lighting conditions.

    So your eye opens up in dark, and contrasts to focus against the conditions of HP, computer screens.

    Your daily activities. How much time you spend looking at close ups.... You are conditioning your eye to fix at that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No I vehemently disagree! Vehemently! Close work DOES NOT cause myopia. It DOES NOT "condition your eye", etc etc. That is a 100+ year old myth that has been repeatedly debunked and is still somehow perpetuated like this post above. It is UNTRUE. myopia is genertic. Gosh if it were as simple as "avoiding near work" or "plus lens" usage etc etc we as a profession would have solved this LONG AGO.

      Delete
    2. It doesn't have to be either/or with medical conditions. Genetics and lifestyle can both be factors. Have you read the 2008 British optometry article "Nearwork-induced transient myopia (NITM) and permanent myopia--is there a link?" Sure, there might be credible sources which say otherwise, but a practitioner should at least inform patients (and their parents) that there is some question as to whether lifestyle can influence myopia development. As for your last statement, avoiding near work is usually quite difficult.

      Delete
    3. I don't need to worry about "informing my patients" about a longstanding myth that most people believe anyway and is all over the Internet. My job is to be the voice of reason, medicine and science

      Delete
  77. i just needed to get my eyesight back to normal... :/

    ReplyDelete
  78. At the start of the video, he shows darkness. BUT A BORN BLIND BEING CANNOT DEFINE DARKNESS. I DOUBT IF A BORN BLIND BEING HAS ANY IDEA WHAT DARKNESS IS ALL ABOUT. The method employed here to sell in Mr. Kemp's video has a name: is called False Dichotomy.

    ReplyDelete
  79. SAMSON AND HIS EYES
    What made me come here was the following which asks me the question: 'Am I being scammed?'
    1. I live in a latin speaking country. Some three years ago I visited a private laser clinic. I had problems with floating spots in my eyes, especially the left.
    2. I was lead to believe my problem was Cataracts. For 2000 dollar my left eye would be cured. Another 2000 for my right.
    3. Recently I went to another clinic as I neglected by first. Here I was told I would get blind on my left eye, unless prompt medical treatment. The eye specialist recommended Phaco emmulsification and IOL implantation in both eyes (his spelling).
    4. Getting suspicious a friend who had had Cataracts gave me his doctor. I went to him without telling him about my former visits to 'specialists'. Not a word about me having Cataracts. He gave me a new list of my eyes to wear glasses, which I have hardly used.
    5. All this cost my 70 dollar. Then watching the Internet I could see my problem had little to do with Cataracts but with floating eye spots. My friend's eye problem was not connected with mine. My vision is good, only the spots at times are bothersome.
    How can a profession such as eye curing be so contradictory? And so at variety with cost going up to thousand of dollars? Two specialists wanting me operated at the cost of thousands of dollars. What are ordinary people going to do with such a disagreement.
    Can this be explained. Is the curing of eyes a massive huge scam?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Professionals disagree. Happens all the time. Sounds like the problem you are describing is one of differing diagnoses...which happens all the time every day in every single medical profession.

      Although a little more prevalent in underdeveloped countries...

      Delete
  80. I actually bought the program, I know... foolish right? In 2 months I have seen NO improvement in my vision. What a waste of money! SCAM.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To claim that something is a scam because it didn't work for you is a bit fallacious. Any treatment is going to get varying results, unless the results aimed for simply aren't possible (whether such vision improvement is possible seems to be something that optometrists disagree with each other on.)

      Delete
    2. in general I agree with this statement, except that in this instance I am a medical professional and I am telling you point blank that this is a scam.

      Delete
  81. As soon as I entered my cc# for the "system" purchase the talky-talky "doctor" went mum. Wait! Wait! I needed more information, a mailing address, an e-mail address, a phone number....Too bad for me. He was gone and so was my money. His e-book never came up for down-load. The charge on my cc did post, however. I complained to cc company. Click bank covered me. Thanks for a truthful account of this untruthful bogus cure from an unethical "doc."

    ReplyDelete
  82. I checked this out months ago, big mistake as you have to give your email address to access. It is a scam to get your email address and use it to send all sorts of spam emails to scam people out of their money. Soon after I started getting all sorts of spam emails, it is crazy when you get spam sent from you to you. I just knew that website was the culprit.

    ReplyDelete
  83. the video I saw told me that the doctor is portrayed by an actor. This makes me wonder if the stooges he gets off the street are also actors as well as the testimonials. There is a web site called fiverr that has paid testimonials that I have seen used for fx binary option scam sites so I wonder if these actors / stooges are from this web site.

    ReplyDelete
  84. I wore glasses for over 20 years. My distance vision slowly got worse. I have heard of the Bates method but never tried it, and I certainly have to wonder if this is not just another attempt to capitalize off of a book that is public domain for anyone who wants to search for William H. Bates and try it. I have seen other sites selling this book for a ridiculous price!

    I have seen information that is credible that glasses do contribute to the slow degradation of eyesight. If doctors claim it is due to aging, why do children and people still going through the growth phase of their lives (when generally ends in the late 20s to early 30s). I have also tried multiple-pinhole glasses and found that they do help my eyesight and tend to reverse the effects of staring at LED screens, but I can't seem to find out where to buy one that is designed for my face and eyes - the spacing of the holes is a bit off.

    In 2001, I had Lasik. I was warned of side effects such as halos, reduced reading vision, dry eyes and so on. I had problems with halos for a few years, too, and now I am +1 for reading and have been unable to read the tiny print I could easily read before I even needed reading glasses. Since I started using reading glasses, my vision problem has become worse. Aside from that, I have enjoyed almost 20/20 vision.

    I highly doubt the veracity of this video, however I will acknowledge that there may be a "conspiracy" against alternatives to glasses since, actually, there is ONE manufacturer of almost all glasses in the US, and they also own two of the top eyeglasses store chains in the nation. I forgot the name but they are located in Europe and even produce designer glasses for major names. Since they control almost the entire market, they fix prices and if smaller companies want to sell their products they are forced to deal with this giant or risk going out of business because of its stranglehold on the industry. Such a business would most certainly be able to use its influence to discredit anyone who came up with a viable alternative that would cause their revenues to decrease significantly.

    Just as we are stuck at the nipple of pesticide companies, pharmaceutical companies and others, it may be true that the free market principal no longer exists for our eyes. Something to consider, if you will.

    ReplyDelete
  85. "I have seen information that is credible that glasses do contribute to the slow degradation of eyesight."

    I haven't.

    "If doctors claim it is due to aging, why do children and people still going through the growth phase of their lives (when generally ends in the late 20s to early 30s)"

    Doctors do not claim myopia is from aging. It's from genetics.

    And there is no worldwide conspiracy to make people use glasses.



    ReplyDelete
  86. Dear Michael thanks for saving us from scam !!!

    ReplyDelete
  87. Michael big time thanks !!!

    ReplyDelete
  88. I camed here looking affter the torrent link, wich is fake or even virus, and i have read some comments, if the most people in here will focus on the solution and not into the posible scam or not maybe we can get a better view all together. For example, we have some things clear, bates method is good, so are eye training exercises(eyes...), diet, sleep(circadian rithms), detox, believe, visualizations, washing the eyes with "euphrasia"(the plant for the vision), surely one of my problems is the inner resistance towards practicing all this things wich is something that have to do with beliefs so here we can work as well. Please bear in mind your desires and forget the crap, there seems to be allways some one that likes to f***ck any thing but this is because that person herself has a disease, some of them may recover if they have the capacity to be honest with themselves but dont charge them. What this doctor does is in fact an open eyes intent so lets follor the clear path. Be Well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "For example, we have some things clear, bates method is good, so are eye training exercises(eyes...)"

      nope. worthless.

      "detox, believe, visualizations, washing the eyes with "euphrasia"(the plant for the vision)"

      worthless, crap, waste of time, alchemy.

      be well!

      Delete
  89. I finally watched the whole dumb video. They could have at least hired some better actors. That fake Dr. Kemp reminded me of the scam artist infomercial guy Kevin Trudeaux who went to prison.

    ReplyDelete
  90. I did read up on this Dr. Kemp and someone had tracked him down, he is an actor paid to do the infomercial. So no Dr there at all Annonymous. I think it sad in todays life that people will do this to other people. The real problem is the corrupt minds that seek to rob peoples money. Maybe we should write a book on how to fart right to instantly heal you from any disease and while we are at it we will knowingly and deliberately deceive, mislead and LIE to people to take their money, so that all those people who are desperate to get well can die destitute and in misery - would that suit you Annonymous? Would you be a better person if this was done. I cannot fathom how you could condone this behaviour.

    ReplyDelete

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